Amesbury MA Rocky Hill Meeting House parsonage

Amesbury historic houses

5 Andrews Street, Amesbury, the Charles B. Fowler house (c 1775)
5 Andrews Street, the Charles B. Fowler house (c 1775)

5 Andrews Street, the Charles B. Fowler house (c 1775) is typical of the many mid to late-l8th century houses found in Amesbury’s Salisbury Point district. The house is two stories high 5ive bays wide with a broad gabled roof pierced by a large central chimney. The central entry possesses a transom and is framed by pilasters and a dentilled entablature. First-story windows have molded caps, while second-story windows rise to the cornice. Gable ends have flush eaves. Other features include 9/6 sash , a granite foundation , and a two-story rear lean-to. Salisbury Point developed in the 18th and early 19th centuries as a major shipbuilding center, and the houses on Andrews Lane are associated with this development. The original ownership of 5 Andrews Lane is unclear, but maps and directories indicate that the house was owned and occupied between 1854 and 1872 by Charles B. Fowler, between 1872 and 1874 by Frank M. Andrews, farmer, and owned by 1884 by Osgood.

Stephen Flanders House, 265 Elm St. Amesbury MA (c 1665).
Stephen Flanders House, 265 Elm St. Amesbury MA (c 1665).

Stephen Flanders House, 265 Elm St. Amesbury MA (c 1665).This house has a marker with the date ‘1665’ prominently displayed on its facade. While such an ancient origin is not indicated by an examination of the exterior, deed records substantiate the local tradition. In 1650 a Steven Flanders was “admitted a townman on the condition that he “constantly keep the town herd of cows.”

Morrill House, 1 Laurel Pl Amesbury MA (c 1720
Morrill House, 1 Laurel Pl Amesbury MA (c 1720).

Morrill House, 1 Laurel Pl Amesbury MA (c 1720). The original ownership of the house is unknown, but by 1854 it was owned by A. Morrill, and from at least 1872 through 1884 it was owned and occupied by Albert B. Gale, hatter. Possibly a First Period house, with uneven spacing of bays, one-room depth with a two-story rear lean-to, and flush eaves suggesting its early date.

Flanders-Pettengill house, Amesbury
Flanders-Pettengill house, 201 Elm St., Amesbury (c 1730)

The Flanders-Lamprey-Pettengill House, 201 Elm Street is two stories high, five bays wide with a broad gabled roof pierced by a rebuilt central chimney. The entry porch is ornamented by pilasters and a pediment, and possesses a pair of 4/4 windows. A one-story ell extends to the rear, and a shed lean-to forms a Beverly jog at the building’s northwest end. Other features include 9/6 and 6/6 sash and flush eaves. The owners have documented the house to 1753, and believe it to have been built prior to 1730 on land owned by Benjamin Flanders. The house was owned by Sam and John Lamprey (acquired ca. 1843), passing in the 1930s to the Pettengill family. AME.281

Rocky Hill Meeting House, Amesbury MA. Rocky Hill Meeting House at 255 Elm St. in Amesbury
Rocky Hill Meeting House

The 1785 Rocky Hill Meeting House at 255 Elm St. in Amesbury, originally part of Salisbury, Massachusetts, is now a non-profit museum owned by Historic New England) and is open to the public several afternoons a year. Situated on a rocky ledge, the remarkably unaltered meeting house is an example of traditional New England church architecture. It replaced an earlier structure used by the West Parish of Salisbury constructed in1716. In 1785, the citizenry voted to build a new meeting house west of the parsonage house near Rocky Hill. George Washington stopped there in 1789, to greet the townspeople on his way north. The interior of the meeting house has remained nearly unchanged since it was built. It preserves the original high pulpit, pentagonal sounding board, deacon’s desk, marbleized columns, box pews,unfinished stairs to the gallery, and a sloping gallery on three sides.

Rocky Hill Meeting House parsonage, Amesbury MA
Rocky Hill Meeting House parsonage, Amesbury MA

The Rocky Hill Meeting House parsonage at 255 Elm St. dates to 1718. The first Rocky Hill Meeting House for the West Parish of Salisbury was completed in 1716. Its parsonage was erected in 1718 on a site north of the building. In January 1785, the citizenry voted to build a new meeting house just west of the parsonage house near Rocky Hill.

Macy-Colby House, 257 Main St. Amesbury MA, (1649/1745)
Macy-Colby House, 257 Main St. Amesbury MA, (b 1745)

Macy-Colby House, 257 Main St. Amesbury MA, (1745). The original Macy-Colby House was built by Thomas Macy, probably about 1649, and sold to Anthony Colby in 1654. The structure was extensively modified by Obadiah Colby in the early 1740’s. Nine generations of Colby’s lived in this house. Thomas Macy was Amesbury’s first town clerk, held many town offices and was involved in numerous land transactions. He left Amesbury in 1659. How much of the original First Period house remains is uncertain, but all of the main building is pre-Revolutionary in origin. Typical is the symmetrical three-bay facade, massive center chimney, and rear salt-box lean-to. Another ell, at right angles to the rear northeast corner, dates from the mid-nineteenth century. The room interior has a huge fireplace with brick ovens in the keeping and four smaller fireplaces in the parlor, bedrooms and loom room. MACRIS: AME.483

Theophilus Foot House, 272 Main St. Amesbury MA c 1692.
Theophilus Foot House, 272 Main St. Amesbury MA c 1692.

Theophilus Foot House, 272 Main St. Amesbury MA c 1692. The Ferry District was one of Amesbury’s earliest settlements, dating from the 17th century. The house bears a plaque reading, Theophilus Foot, 1692, while another source refers to the house as the Blaisdell-Woodman house. A violent tornado occurred August 14, 1773, doing particular damage in the Ferry District, and blowing down “Theophilus Foot’s new house.” By 1854 the property was owned and occupied by Elliot D. Stone, agent, and later his widow.philus Foot’s new house.” By 1854 the property was owned and occupied by Elliot D. Stone, agent, and later his widow.

Isaac Morrill House, 48 Portsmouth Rd. Amesbury MA c 1680.
Isaac Morrill House, 48 Portsmouth Rd. Amesbury MA c 1680.

Isaac Morrill House, 48 Portsmouth Rd. Amesbury MA c 1680. Isaac Morrill was the eldest son of seven children of Abraham Morrill. The elder Morrill was one of the area’s first settlers, operating a corn mill and farm and working as a blacksmith. Upon his death in 1662, he left his son Isaac a “new house and 56 acres.” The main house is one bay deep, and a two-story lean-to extends to the rear. AME.276

1-2 Evans Place, the Stevens – Fifield house, Amesbury MA
1 Evans Place, Amesbury MA

1-2 Evans Place, the Stevens – Fifield house is typical of the many mid to late-18th century houses found in Amesbury’s Salisbury Point district. The house is two stories high, five bays wide with a broad gabled roof pierced by a large central chimney, a dentil cornice, 6/6 sash, and flush eaves. A one-story hipped ell extends at the east side, and a Beverly jog exists at the west end. While the original ownership of 1-2 Evans Place is unknown, it appears to have been constructed in the middle of the 18th Century and owned as a double house as early as 1854, when the owners were Stevens and Fifield. By 1872 Mrs. Colby and Miss N. Fowler owned and occupied the house, and in 1884 Mrs. Colby and J. Bartlett were listed as owners. AME.128. View realtor photos of inside the house.

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