5 Argilla Rd., Andover MA

Andover historic houses

This page displays the First Period, Georgian, and early Federal houses in Andover, Massachusetts. The images, and text were provided by the Andover Historical Commission in the 1980’s, and are online through the Massachusetts Historical Commission site (MACRIS). Photos are displayed alphabetically in order of street name, and some house numbers may have changed. Dates of construction on the MACRIS site were often based on local tradition rather than construction analysis, and should be therefore considered unreliable. View more historic houses on the Andover Historic Preservation website.

To request or add information to this page, please contact Gordon Harris at historicipswich@gmail.com. Visit the About page to request additional research, including a deed and history search, a PDF report and creation of a page about your house on this site.

On the houses shown below, click on the ANV link to view the house at the MACRIS site, and click on the INV link to download a PDF file about the house, produced by the Andover Historical Commission.

Resources:

58 Abbott St., Andover MA
ANV.14 58 Abbot St., Andover MA (c. 1745) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation

This saltbox house was moved from North Andover by Helen Shattuck Yeaw to this property in 1948 – 1949. The unconfirmed construction date is listed as 1745 in the town assessor records. This property was once part of a larger parcel of land owned by John H. Abbot. Read more at Andover Historic Preservation.

189 Abbot St., Andover MA r1750
ANV.16 189 Abbot St., Andover MA (by 1770, with later additions) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

This unusual house has a Federal front façade but an overhanging gable roofed second floor in the rear. Property deeds “with buildings” trace back to when John & Louis Sawin sold a two acre parcel with building at the north end of Preston’s Plain to John Herrick on Oct. 16, 1778. Alfred Poore’s History of Andover, printed in1863 states there was an earlier house at this location was dismantled and removed: “Now this part of it is the cottage of Dr. Whiting’s place, and one part is incorporated into the lower story of Mr. Goldsmith’s house, and was removed there when the house was taken away about 1790.” Read more at Andover Historic Preservation.

The eastern (right) side of the house at 9 Andover St. was built in 1711, and the western portion, to the left of the entryway, was built in 1713.
Abbot, Benjamin House 9 Andover MA St., Andover MA (dendrochronology: 1711 / 1713) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Oxford Dendrochronology Lab determined that the eastern (right) side of the house at 9 Andover St. was built in 1711, and the western portion, to the left of the entryway, was built in 1713. The house was long thought to date to 1685 and is named for Benjamin Abbot, son of an early settler of Andover. The house remained in the Abbot family until 1933. There are four large rooms on the ground floor, a huge chimney and a fireplace in every room. A layer of brick in the walls acts as insulation. Read more at Andover Historic Preservation and at Wikipedia.

Estimated to have been built about 1685, the house at 5 Argilla Rd. is one of Andover's oldest houses, a part of which was supposedly built by Thomas Abbot, a third-generation colonist.
ANV.45 Abbot, Thomas – Baker, Dr. Symonds House 5 Argilla Rd., Andover MA (by 1697) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Estimated to have been built about 1685, the house at 5 Argilla Rd. is one of Andover’s oldest houses, a part of which was supposedly built by Thomas Abbot, a third-generation colonist. who bought the property with a house on it in 1652 from Job Tyler. The kitchen is said to be the earliest original room, dating possibly to 1671. Thomas Abbot II acquired the property through inheritance and built or reconstructed a house here in 1697, which is the more probable date of original construction. The house remained in the Abbot family until 1797, when it was sold to Dr. Symonds Baker. His descendants retained ownership into the 1980s. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. View Wikipedia and Andover Historic Preservation.

Samuel Bailey house, Andover MA
ANV.605 Bailey, Samuel and Sally House 125 Bailey Rd., Andover MA (1790). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Samuel and Sally Bailey purchased 5 acres of land in the Bailey Rd. area on Mar. 18, 1790. The main block of the house at 125 Bailey Road is a double pile (2 rooms deep), three bay, two-story structure with a gable roof, consistent with late Georgian or Federal houses constructed between 1780 -1830. On the right is an elongated gable-roofed ell of probable 19th Century origin that appears to have once been an English-type barn. Between the two sections is a small two-story Victorian-era ell that probably dates to when the barn and house were connected. The Bailey family maintained ownership through the mid-20th Century. Read more at Andover Historic Preservation.

The house at 4 Bancroft Rd. was once part of the Pearson Farm on Main St., located where the Phillips Academy hockey rink complex was built. It was moved to this location in 2006.
ANV.606 4 Bancroft Rd., Andover MA (c. 1750-) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The house at 4 Bancroft Rd. was once part of the Pearson Farm on Main St., located where the Phillips Academy hockey rink complex was built. It was moved to this location in 2006 where it was oriented to face east. View this house at Andover Historic Preservation.

72 Brundett Ave., Andover MA
ANV.86 72 Brundrett Ave Andover MA (c. 1750) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

No construction information is available for the house at 72 Brundrett St. The 2-pile depth is indicative of the mid-18th Century, but the asymmetrical façade and central chimney suggest the possibility of an earlier house that was expanded.  A 20 acre portion of this property was purchased by Moses Bailey (aka Bayley) on July 20, 1768 from Ralph Holbrook of Andover and Samuel Aspinwall of Brookline. One deed refers to a Nathan Boyle dated Nov. 11, 1735 which includes a portion of this parcel.

Abbot, John Lovejoy House 57 Central St., Andover MA (c 1700).
ANV.114 Abbot, John Lovejoy House 57 Central St., Andover MA (c 1700). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Construction of the house at 57 Central St. in Andover has traditionally been attributed to John Lovejoy Abbot (1648 – 1721) around 1678, but by appearance seems more likely to be at least a couple of decades later. The original kitchen is said to be the “Oldest Room in Andover.” The house has been restored several times, and moved more than once. Greatly modernized, little if any of the original interior woodwork remains, but photos on the Redfin site show a beveled summer beam in at least one room.

ANV.115 Higgins, Solomen - Abbot, George House 59 Central St., Andover MA 1734
ANV.115 Higgins, Solomen – Abbot, George House 59 Central St., Andover MA (c. 1800) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The elegant house at 59 Central St. in Andover was constructed on a section of the original homestead of George Abbot, a settler of Andover. A date of 1734 was assigned by the Andover Historical Society, but the depth and surviving interior features suggest a fine house from the late Georgian or early Federal era, c 1800. The house is said to have been joined with the house at No. 57 until 1926.

Ballard, Sheribiah - Emery, Francis House 88 Central St., Andover MA
ANV.127 Ballard, Sheribiah – Emery, Francis House 88 Central St., Andover MA (c. 1717 -) Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The history and architecture of the house at 88 Central St. in Andover coincides with the Andover settlement period (1650-1715). Rehabilitation by 20th century owners of this dwelling restored its vernacular Georgian styling. Part of this house may have been the two-room home of Sheribiah Ballard (1688-1749) who built on the land of his father. Sheribiah sold to Capt. John Foster, 1749, “homestead, meadows, building.” The house has a central chimney and is of single pile depth. Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

ANV.168 Dascomb, Jacob House 125 Dascomb Rd., Andover MA c. 1760. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.
Abbot Tavern 70 Elm St., Andover MA
ANV.181 Abbot Tavern 70 Elm St., Andover MA 1776. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The former Abbot Tavern has traditionally been claimed to have been built about 1680, but the late Georgian/Federal structure first appears in town records in 1776, when Isaac Abbot petitioned to operate a tavern. It hosted George Washington when he visited New England in 1789. The tavern served as the town’s first post office, and Isaac Abbot also served as postmaster, selectman and town clerk.

ANV.186 Abbott, Dr. Nehemiah – Lee, Capt. John House 134 Elm St., Andover MA c. 1748. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

This home is said to have been built by Dr. Nehemiah Abbott (1717-1785) on the “old North Parish Road” also known as the “Boston Rd”, on the border of the two parishes. After Dr. Abbott moved to Chelmsford in 1770, the property was owned by Edward Weld and his wife Hannah, who may have purchased it from Dr. Nehemiah Abbott or his family.

Abbot Village Mills Workers Housing 75 Essex St., Andover MA r1720
ANV.203 Abbot Village Mills Workers Housing 75 Essex St., Andover MA (c. 1720 -1800). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Abel & Paschal Abbott moved their wool mill operation here from North Parish about 1813 and sold to Smith & Dove Manufacturing Co. in 1843, which acquired several homes in the immediate area for their workers. The earlier history of this house is unknown. The single room depth, asymmetrical facade and central chimney suggest a house from the early 18th Century, while the exterior trim is indicative of a century later. The rear wing appears to be even later.

Abbot, Moses - Chandler, John House 15 Hidden Rd., Andover MA c1750
ANV.231 Abbot, Moses – Chandler, John House 15 Hidden Rd., Andover MA c. 1750. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

This house was constructed circa 1750 by John Chandler, and was sold 1780 – 1782 to Lt. Gov. Samuel Phillips Jr. and family, who moved here after vacating the George Abbot House, on Phillips Street. Moses Abbot of Andover, who married (1) Martha Frye and (2) Priscilla Flint, moved here after 1802. Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

Holt House 101 Holt Rd., Andover MA c1700
ANV.660 Abbot, David – Noyes – Shattuck House 233 High Plain Rd., Andover MA r. 1735. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

This house was originally part of the Col. Dudley Bradstreet farm, which later became Shattuck Farm. It is of two half-houses on the property constructed in the Georgian period, with a large kitchen fireplace and a paneled chimney breast, more often found in the late First to early Georgian eras. The interior displays Federal-era renovations. In 1981, the house was moved to 233 High Plain Road, after the original Shattuck property was sold to commercial developers. Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

ANV.657 Holt House 101 Holt Rd., Andover MA c. 1700. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Although greatly altered, the oldest part of the house at 101 Holt Rd. features a First Period staircase, gunstock beams, chamfered hewn beams and Georgian paneling. The earliest owner of record is Joseph Holt Jr. born Jan. 20, 1790, son of Joseph & Abigail Holt. Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

 Holt, Joseph - Stinson, Capt. James H. House 233 Holt Rd., Andover MA c1720
ANV.274 Holt, Joseph House 233 Holt Rd., Andover MA c. 1720. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

This classic but rundown New England saltbox provides ample evidence of its antiquity. On the roof to the right of the central chimney is a very visible line showing that it was expanded from an original half house. The “broken back” saltbox roofline indicates that the lean-to was an addition, not integral to the original construction. The upper window framing abuts the beam, rather than providing space for a frieze, as is found in later Georgian and Federal houses. The 1830 and 1852 Dorman maps of Andover shows Joseph Holt as the owner. This First Period house is currently in a visible state of decay. Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

ANV.300 Chandler – Bigsby – Abbot House 88 Lowell St., Andover MA (after 1688). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The oldest part of this house is traditionally said to have been built before 1673 by Captain Thomas Chandler, but it may date to 1688, when Thomas Chandler sold his son-in-law Captain Daniel Bigsby a piece of land next to his house. His daughter Hannah and her husband Captain Bigsby continued to occupy this house after the death of Hannah’s parents. Summer beams in the oldest section are beaded rather than chamfered, suggesting construction during the transition period from 1700 to 1720. Features which testify to this house’s age are gunstock posts, plank sheathing, wide floor boards and its preserved narrow staircase. Several additions have been made to the original four-room, lean-to house, including an 18th century ell and hipped roof. Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

108 Lowell St., Andover MA
ANV.301 108 Lowell St., Andover MA (c 1750). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Although the house at 108 Lowell St. is said to have been built about 1692, the tradition is not substantiated by its 2-pile mass.. Recently exposed beams throughout the house are rough and neither chamfered or beaded, indicating the early Georgian era or later. The fireplace and chimney are not original. The Mooar family owned the property in the nineteenth century and were direct descendants of Abraham Mooar (1660-1706). Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

221-223 Main St., Andover MA 1750
ANV.362 221-223 Main St., Andover MA (1824). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The one acre lot at 221-223 Main Street was once owned by George Wardwell. It was purchased by merchants Degrass and John Shipman on Feb. 3, 1824 for $300, who took a mortgage from the Trustees of Phillips Academy and built this double house.

Blanchard - Upton House 62 Osgood St., Andover MA r1720
ANV.420 Blanchard – Upton House 7 Hearthstone Place, Andover MA (c. 1720). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The Blanchard-Upton House was built between the time Thomas Blanchard acquired the land in 1699 and his death by 1740 when his son, Josiah, inherited the farm. The western half contains brick nogging between the inside walls and outer sheathing, suggesting it could be older. A massive 10′ wide fireplace is one of the largest in Massachusetts. The frame is integral throughout with an integral lean-to, and exposed interior framing features quirked beading typical of transitional early 18th century houses. Feather-edged interior sheathing suggests a 1730 date of construction. Visit Andover Historic Preservation.

The original building at 117 Osgood St. in Andover , traditionally dated from 1699, the year of Stephen Osgood's marriage to Hannah Blanchard,
ANV.422 Osgood, Stephen House and Farm 116 Osgood St., Andover MA c. 1700. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The original building at 117 Osgood St. in Andover , traditionally dated from 1699, the year of Stephen Osgood’s marriage to Hannah Blanchard, consisted of four rooms built around a central chimney; Isaac Osgood is thought to have added the eastern part of the house (making it L-shaped) and the northeast corner wing.

 68 Phillips St., Andover MA
ANV.434 Poor, Dea. Daniel – Cogswell, Francis House 68 Phillips St., Andover MA 1763. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

Deacon Daniel Poor (1740-1814) was a prosperous farmer and deacon of South Church, when he built this house. He served 7 years in the Revolutionary army in Capt. Benjamin Ames Company. He was at Lexington and Concord and Bunker Hill. He married Hannah Prye in 1763 and is said to have built this mansion house soon afterwards. The house had three Rufus Porter murals, a restored one in an upstairs bedroom. This house was the Old Poor Tavern during the Revolution but there is no other verification of this. The estate went to widow Hannah and son Nathaniel Poor who inherited via probate will on Oct. 12, 1821. She died Jan. 16, 1824. Nathaniel Poor sold the house to Ezra Abbott and wife Hannah on Feb. 11, 1823. The deed states, Mansion house, wood, corn and chaise houses and barn also the tan yard near by. Ezra Abbott sold to Isaac Jones and wife Nancy on Apr. 21, 1834 for $170

 84 Poor St., Andover MA
ANV.636 84 Poor St., Andover MA r. 1750 Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

This property was once held by James Parker & Benjamin Ames Jr. both of Andover. A half-acre parcel was sold to John Wardwell, a Cordwainer, for six pounds on Nov. 3, 1794. The timber in this well-preserved vernacular cottage is hand-hewn and doweled with hand-forged nails.

The house at 37 Porter Road in Andover MAis said to have been built by Joseph Ballard in 1758 for himself and his widowed mother, two stories with gambrel roof.
ANV.443 Manning, Thomas House 37 Porter Rd., Andover MA c. 1760. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The house at 37 Porter Road is said to have been built by Joseph Ballard in 1758 for himself and his widowed mother, two stories with gambrel roof. Thomas Manning moved to Andover and bought the Ballard house shortly after their marriage on June 6, 1769 to Mehitable Kidder b. Feb. 22, 1749.

Blunt, William Farm 61 Porter Rd., Andover MA
ANV.445 Blunt, William Farm 61 Porter Rd., Andover MA (Georgian). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The Ballard family owned the land, circa 1680s. The lot was purchased by the Blunt family about 1709. William Blunt sold to David Blunt in 1724. He had an only child, Mary F. who married Peter Shedd from Tewksbury and made their home here. Peter Shed sold the farm to Andrew B. & Mary Ann Stimpson of Reading, MA on Nov. 15, 1837 for $2850. The paired chimneys indicate a late 18th Century house, or that it was renovated by removing the original fireplace and chimney to create a central hall, which was common around the turn of the 19th Century.

Holt, Nicholas III House and Farm 89 Prospect Rd., Andover MA
ANV.450 Holt, Nicholas III House and Farm 89 Prospect Rd., Andover MA (after 1714). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The oldest part of the traditional saltbox house at 89 Prospect Rd. is said to have been built by Timothy Holt in 1714 on land granted to Nicholas Holt in 1661. Until 1883, the property was continuously owned and farmed by seven generations of descendants of Nicholas Holt. The front of the building has a later addition.

Abbot, D. House 239 River Rd., Andover MA
ANV.480 Abbot, D. House 239 River Rd., Andover MA (c 1750). Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The property at 239 River Rd. was once owned by David and Priscilla Abbot, and was inherited by then son David Abbot Jr. No documentation is available to confirm the 1711 date of construction. The central chimney, symmetrical facade and 2-pile depth suggest the mid-18th Century.

The Andover assessors site gives a date of 1766 for the house at 249 River Rd., which is confirmed by its balanced façade, two-room depth, and central chimney.
ANV.481 Abbott, Jonathon House 249 River Rd., Andover MA , 1766. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The Andover assessors site gives a date of 1766 for the house at 249 River Rd., which is confirmed by its balanced façade, two-room depth, and central chimney. A considerable amount of fine Georgian paneling, doors and other woodwork has survived, and is in excellent condition. The front door opens to a small entrance facing stairs and the chimney wall, typical of early Colonials.

ANV.504 Holt – Cummings – Davis House 67 Salem St., Andover MA c. 1720. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The elongated cape at 67 Salem St is said to have been built about 1704, but documentation is not available. Exposed unchamfered summer beams suggest it may date to a couple of decades later. The first known owner of this house was William Hawley, who purchased it in 1803. Job Abbott bought the house in 1835 as a wedding gift for his daughter Lucy, who married Joseph Holt in that year. The Holts moved the house across the street to its present location between 1852 and 1872. Architect George Sherwood bought the house in 1961 and restored it, keeping old beams but replacing other old materials with reproductions. Gunstock posts and unchamfered summer beams are exposed throughout the house.

The house at 212 Salem St. in Andover is said to have been built by Robert Gray at the beginning of the 18th Century.
ANV.505 Gray, Robert House 212 Salem St., Andover MA, after 1700. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The house at 212 Salem St. is said to have been built by Robert Gray at the beginning of the 18th Century. Robert Gray, mariner, married Hannah Holt and received this land as a gift from his father-in-law, Nicholas Holt. A 1765 deed transferred the property from from James Holt and James Holt III to Timothy Holt, with mention of dwelling-house. The original chimney was removed when the house was enlarged ca. 1765 to 1830.

The house at 373 South Main St. is traditionally said to have been built about 1740 by blacksmith Jonathan Holt on land of his father, Oliver Holt.
ANV.542 Holt, Jonathan – Cogswell, Samuel House 373 South Main St., Andover MA 1740. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The house at 373 South Main St. is traditionally said to have been built about 1740 by blacksmith Jonathan Holt on land of his father, Oliver Holt, and was sold to Thomas Holt in 1762, who sold to Samuel Cogswell of Chebacco Parish, Ipswich about 1764. Gunstock posts and unchamfered summer beams now exposed throughout the house suggest mid-18th Century construction. The saltbox house is two piles deep with a shed extension, which was added by Samuel Cogswell Jr. after his marriage to May Eaton in 1793.

Abbot - Stinson House 6 Stinson Rd., Andover MA r. 1725
ANV.547 Abbot – Stinson House 6 Stinson Rd., Andover MA r. 1725. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

The Abbott-Stinson house at 6 Stinson Rd. is traditionally dated c.1720-1726. This is consistent with the quirk-beaded frame seen throughout the west side, which was probably the kitchen and kitchen chamber. These elements are similar to the frame of the Parson Barnard House in North Andover (c.1715). Originally one room deep, its form was changed by later rear additions of the 20th century. There is no evidence, however, in the attic frame (principals with purlins and ridge pole) or stone cellar, that the house began as a one-room plan. The west rooms have exposed summer and tie beams, in the normal longitudinal and transverse directions respectively, both with quirked beads running to the ends without stops. The posts, girts, and plates are also quirk-beaded where exposed. The second floor west side has flared gunstock corner posts.

13 Sunset Rock Rd., Andover MA r. 1750.
ANV.563 13 Sunset Rock Rd., Andover MA r. 1750. Photo courtesy of Andover Historic Preservation.

No construction data is available for the house at 13 Sunset Rock. Architectural features suggest the mid-18th Century.

Plan of Andover in 1692, prepared by the Andover Historical Society
Plan of Andover in 1692, prepared by the Andover Historical Society

Further reading:

Historical sketches of Andover, (comprising the present towns of North Andover and Andover) by Bailey, Sarah Loring